tag:china.professor-murmann.net,2013:/posts JPM China Blog 2017-06-12T08:08:29Z J Peter Murmann tag:china.professor-murmann.net,2013:Post/1163042 2017-06-12T08:08:29Z 2017-06-12T08:08:29Z China innovates on the tram concept - first tram bus

We could have perhaps saved a lot of money in Sydney if we had deployed this new Chinese technology. 


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tag:china.professor-murmann.net,2013:Post/1132247 2017-02-17T22:25:19Z 2017-02-17T22:25:51Z China to make the first taxi drone, the Ehang 184

It is now being tested in Dubai. 

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tag:china.professor-murmann.net,2013:Post/1103838 2016-10-31T11:19:21Z 2016-10-31T11:20:45Z Country Ranking of Innovation: China still has to catch up with most advanced countries

Full story at: http://econ.st/2e4CNHP 

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tag:china.professor-murmann.net,2013:Post/1073194 2016-07-15T22:58:27Z 2017-05-27T02:03:43Z Why China is building infrastructure so fast: See this incredible machine ]]> Novalis tag:china.professor-murmann.net,2013:Post/1068770 2016-07-01T07:00:56Z 2016-07-01T07:01:30Z BusinessThink interviews me on our book "China's Innovation Challenge" ]]> Novalis tag:china.professor-murmann.net,2013:Post/1066184 2016-06-23T05:26:42Z 2016-06-23T05:28:19Z China's Innovation Challenge now available in Chinese 中国创新的挑战:跨越中等收入陷阱

Peking University Press is publishing the Chinese Version of China's Innovation Challenge

中国创新的挑战:跨越中等收入陷阱

The book can be ordered in China for RMB 62. 

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tag:china.professor-murmann.net,2013:Post/964816 2016-05-06T09:29:00Z 2016-05-17T00:20:27Z Just published: China's Innovation Challenge: Overcoming the Middle Income Trap 中国创新的挑战

chinas innovation

Edited by  Arie Lewin (Duke University), Martin Kenney (University of California, Davis), Johann Peter Murmann (UNSW Australia)  - April 2016 - Cambridge University Press

The miracle growth of the Chinese economy has decreased from a compound annual growth rate of 10% to less than 7% in 2015, raising questions about China?s prospects of avoiding the ?middle income trap?.The two engines of growth -- exporting on a scale never before witnessed and massive infrastructure investments -- are approaching the limits of diminishing returns.  Assuming that current political arrangements prevail and that western socio-political economic models are not adopted, can China develop a new growth model with innovation at its center? This volume brings together leading Chinese and international scholars who examine the role of culture, institutions, national policy, firm and individual dimensions in shaping the operation of firms, industries and technologies. Their analyses of the daunting challenges of building an innovation-driven growth model for China range from quite optimistic to deeply pessimistic. The book will appeal to scholars, policy-makers and business persons.

Table of Contents

Biographical Details of Contributors

Pre-order on Amazon
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tag:china.professor-murmann.net,2013:Post/1035628 2016-04-18T02:02:37Z 2016-04-18T02:02:37Z Excellent Information article in Economist about Massive Party Reshuffle

Loyal to the core
Legislators will soon meet to discuss a new five-year economic plan. But China’s leaders are more worried about their own jobs

Mar 5th 2016 

http://www.economist.com/news/china/21693948-legislators-will-soon-meet-discuss-new-five-year-economic-plan-chinas-leaders-are-more
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tag:china.professor-murmann.net,2013:Post/1024217 2016-04-03T04:52:08Z 2016-04-30T03:26:12Z Young, single and what about it?
The  Economist reports: "In the decade to 2010 the number of single-person households doubled. Today over 58m Chinese live by themselves, according to census data, a bigger number of one-person homes than in America, Britain and France combined. Solo dwellers make up 14% of all households. That is still low compared with rates found in Japan or Taiwan (see chart), but the proportion will certainly increase. The better-educated under-30-year-olds are, and the more money they have, the more likely they are to live alone. Rich parts of China have more non-widowed single dwellers: in Beijing a fifth of homes house only one person. The marriage age is rising, particularly in big cities such as Shanghai and Guangzhou, where the average man marries after 30 and the average woman at 28, older than their American counterparts. Divorce rates are also increasing, though they are still much lower than in America. More than 3.5m Chinese couples split up each year, which adds to the number of single households."



http://www.economist.com/news/china/21662592-article-looks-sharp-rise-young-chinese-happy-live-themselves-next-old"
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tag:china.professor-murmann.net,2013:Post/972388 2016-01-16T22:47:27Z 2016-01-16T22:47:27Z Policy Makers in China simply follow what is happening on the ground
Consistent with Victor Nee and Sonjia Opper’s central thesis in "Capitalism from Below: Markets and Institutional Change in China",  Leslie Chang offers this observation of how change takes place in China: 

I lived in China from 1998 to 2007, and the longer I stayed, the more I felt that governance was a frantic effort to keep up with what was happening on the ground. The economic opening championed by Deng Xiaoping was actually set in motion in 1978 by a group of Anhui farmers who illegally split up their communal farmland into individual plots, which led to increased efficiency and the dismantling of the communes.


Source: http://www.chinafile.com/many-china-one-child-policy-already-irrelevant
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tag:china.professor-murmann.net,2013:Post/914207 2015-10-07T21:55:31Z 2015-10-07T21:56:11Z First self-driving Bus in China Mercedes just announced self-driving trucks. China just had it first self-driving bus. 


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tag:china.professor-murmann.net,2013:Post/887289 2015-07-28T10:49:14Z 2015-07-28T10:51:59Z Review of “China’s Path to Innovation” by Xiaolan Fu

To date there are few research monographs that go beyond picking out striking cases of innovative companies. We clearly also need systematic analyses of China’s growing innovative capacity. For this reason, Xiaolan Fu’s book China's Path to Innovation (Cambridge University Press, 2015) is a welcome addition to the literature. Fu is Professor of Technology and International Development at Oxford and has written about innovation in China for more than ten years. China's Path to Innovation has 16 chapters (Table of Contents).  The book provides an excellent overview of scholarly literature on the development of Chinese innovative capacities. It deserves to be in the library of anyone working on China’s innovative capacity.  Read my full review on economic-evolution.net.

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tag:china.professor-murmann.net,2013:Post/883721 2015-07-20T15:00:00Z 2015-07-20T08:31:29Z High Speed Trains allow planers to dream about new mega cities surrounding Beijing, China

The New York Times filed a report about a plan to create new mega cities  surrounding Beijing.   One of the big obstacles is the inability of local governments to raise their own taxes to pay for services. 

It will be interesting to follow these plans for a Greater Beijing area and how well they work. Read full story.
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tag:china.professor-murmann.net,2013:Post/882822 2015-07-18T10:22:58Z 2015-07-18T10:22:58Z McKinsey Report on Innovation: Useful graphic in what economic sectors China is strong



Source: The China Effect on Global Innovation 

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tag:china.professor-murmann.net,2013:Post/812167 2015-02-16T00:18:25Z 2016-01-05T01:18:24Z Are recent crackdowns on VPNs and Academic Freedom Bad for China’s Ability to Innovate?

I am co-editing with Arie Lewin and Martin Kenney a Cambridge University Press book on the future of Chinese innovative capability. The opening of China in since 1978 has created stunning economic achievements. My hope was that China would prove that you do not necessarily need liberal democracy to continue its economic development and reach GDP per capita figures that are closer to the most advanced countries in the world.

But I am getting more nervous about the future of China after reading this series of articles.

  1. China Tells Schools to Suppress Western Ideas, With One Big Exception
  2. Ideology Matters: Parsing Recent Changes in China’s Intellectual Landscape
  3. China Further Tightens Grip on the Internet
  4. New Rules in China Upset Western Tech Companies
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tag:china.professor-murmann.net,2013:Post/755044 2014-10-14T08:14:34Z 2014-10-14T08:33:55Z Victor Shih wrote fascinating book on how China has been able to keep inflation under control

I am presently reading Victor Shih's Cambridge University Press book "Fraction and Finance." In it he explains how despite periods of high monetary growths and inflation, China's politics allowed hyper-inflation to broad down again. China never experienced the 4000 percent inflation in Ukraine after communism. I publish here some interesting comparative data from the book. 
]]> Novalis tag:china.professor-murmann.net,2013:Post/751984 2014-10-07T11:30:31Z 2014-10-19T06:43:57Z Surprise: In China electric toothbrushes are twice as expensive as in USA The other day I forgot my electric toothbrush in my London hotel room. I figured that because of the great competition in many Chinese products markets, I would be able to buy one more cheaply when I would arrive in China the following week. I had read about price wars in microwave ovens, TV sets, etc.  And did not Chinese manufacturers bring down theprice of solar panels to such a low level that Westerns firms went out of business in larger numbers in the past few years.  So yesterday I set out to buy myself an electronic toothbrush. The prices at a large electronics store in my neighborhood in Shanghai was shockingly high. Next I went online. Even online the best deal I could find was substantially more expensive then in USA.  The same electric toothbrush (Oral-B Professional Healthy CleanPrecision 1000) on Amazon  USA  costs $39.99; on Amazon China it sells for US$  78.28 (RMB 480).   No wonder I am told exchange students are being asked to bring electronic gadgets back from abroad. I wonder if I can find any high quality Chinese imitations, as is the case in smartphones. In the meantime I bought the expensive one on Amazon.cn. 


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tag:china.professor-murmann.net,2013:Post/724272 2014-08-07T10:09:32Z 2014-08-07T10:09:33Z China does not only imitate technologies: Xiaomi's "One more thing..."


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tag:china.professor-murmann.net,2013:Post/661518 2014-03-07T04:45:21Z 2014-03-07T04:51:11Z Economist.com explains how Chinese Economic Success has called into question benefits of democratic rule

Here is a short excerpt  from an Essay "What's gone wrong with democracy"  in the March 1st Economist

Meanwhile, the Chinese Communist Party has broken the democratic world’s monopoly on economic progress. Larry Summers, of Harvard University, observes that when America was growing fastest, it doubled living standards roughly every 30 years. China has been doubling living standards roughly every decade for the past 30 years. The Chinese elite argue that their model—tight control by the Communist Party, coupled with a relentless effort to recruit talented people into its upper ranks—is more efficient than democracy and less susceptible to gridlock. The political leadership changes every decade or so, and there is a constant supply of fresh talent as party cadres are promoted based on their ability to hit targets.

China’s critics rightly condemn the government for controlling public opinion in all sorts of ways, from imprisoning dissidents to censoring internet discussions. Yet the regime’s obsession with control paradoxically means it pays close attention to public opinion. At the same time China’s leaders have been able to tackle some of the big problems of state-building that can take decades to deal with in a democracy. In just two years China has extended pension coverage to an extra 240m rural dwellers, for example—far more than the total number of people covered by America’s public-pension system.

Many Chinese are prepared to put up with their system if it delivers growth. The 2013 Pew Survey of Global Attitudes showed that 85% of Chinese were “very satisfied” with their country’s direction, compared with 31% of Americans. Some Chinese intellectuals have become positively boastful. Zhang Weiwei of Fudan University argues that democracy is destroying the West, and particularly America, because it institutionalises gridlock, trivialises decision-making and throws up second-rate presidents like George Bush junior. Yu Keping of Beijing University argues that democracy makes simple things “overly complicated and frivolous” and allows “certain sweet-talking politicians to mislead the people”. Wang Jisi, also of Beijing University, has observed that “many developing countries that have introduced Western values and political systems are experiencing disorder and chaos” and that China offers an alternative model. Countries from Africa (Rwanda) to the Middle East (Dubai) to South-East Asia (Vietnam) are taking this advice seriously.

China’s advance is all the more potent in the context of a series of disappointments for democrats since 2000. The first great setback was in Russia. After the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 the democratisation of the old Soviet Union seemed inevitable. In the 1990s Russia took a few drunken steps in that direction under Boris Yeltsin. But at the end of 1999 he resigned and handed power to Vladimir Putin, a former KGB operative who has since been both prime minister and president twice. This postmodern tsar has destroyed the substance of democracy in Russia, muzzling the press and imprisoning his opponents, while preserving the show—everyone can vote, so long as Mr Putin wins. Autocratic leaders in Venezuela, Ukraine, Argentina and elsewhere have followed suit, perpetuating a perverted simulacrum of democracy rather than doing away with it altogether, and thus discrediting it further.

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tag:china.professor-murmann.net,2013:Post/617074 2013-11-07T21:17:46Z 2013-11-07T21:18:51Z The Physical Look of Modern China

Timelapse延时摄影《CHINA IN MOTION 韵动中国》2013联合拍摄第1版ver.1 from Timelapse China on Vimeo.

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tag:china.professor-murmann.net,2013:Post/612280 2013-10-24T09:56:32Z 2013-10-24T09:56:33Z Useful Sources of Information on China

The China File

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tag:china.professor-murmann.net,2013:Post/610546 2013-10-19T01:32:56Z 2013-10-19T01:32:57Z Chinese Universities are improving dramatically
See this chart by from 


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